Eating too much Sugar Will Eventually Ruin Your Smile | New York Dentist

34.2 million Americans have been diagnosed with diabetes. And we all understand that sugar is what causes cavities. If we eat too much and don’t look after our teeth afterwards, we are likely to have begun to develop some issues at your next dental checkup. But too much sugar can contribute to the development of diabetes. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, glucose is present in your saliva and when diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva help harmful bacteria grow, and more dental issues than just cavities. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. Some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities, while others cause gum disease and bad breath. This is why diabetics need to be extra careful – because they are prone to gum disease more than non-diabetics. Even further, when blood glucose is high, this gum disease may have the potential to affect blood glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes.

It can be said that overconsumption of sugar may be a major cause of two of the most prevalent diseases in the world, i.e., gum disease and diabetes. National surveys have found that the average American consumes around 77 grams of sugar every day, and the recommended amount is a fraction of that. Overconsumption of sugar leads not only to cavities and gum disease, but also can predispose you to prediabetes and even diabetes. So, while you are celebrating the holiday season, keep your sugar intake in mind. And if you find you are overindulging, make sure you practice proper dental hygiene after every sweet treat.

If you have questions or concerns about diabetes, make an appointment today with Dr. Schnall at 212-247-7059 or visit our website at www.philipschnalldmd.com.

Dr. Philip Schnall proudly serves New York and all surrounding areas.

Cavity Prevention: Your Guide to Halloween Candy | New York Dentist

It’s that time of year again, folks – the spookiest night of the year. And we are all prepared for those tiny ghosts and goblins to haunt our houses, looking for tasty treats. But before you head out for candy in that plastic pumpkin, keep these tips in mind to maintain a healthy smile:

Candy corn. Even though candy corn is a Halloween candy trademark, it is one of the worst Halloween candies for your teeth because of the high amount of sugar, which can lead to tooth decay if neglected.

Caramel apple lollipops. Caramel apple suckers are also a huge symbol of Halloween, but they are extremely bad for your teeth. Not only do they have a caramel coating that can get stuck in your teeth, but they also have a high amount of sugar that can cause tooth decay.

Chewy candy. Chewy candy like Starburst and gummies can hit the spot sometimes. And while some are made with fruit juice, they can stick in the crevices of your teeth, unable to be removed by your toothbrush alone. 

Filled chocolates. Candy bars are one of the most popular items to give out on Halloween, but chocolates filled with caramel, cream, or coconut are bad for your teeth. They stick to your teeth like chewy candy, allowing bacteria to feed on it and cause tooth decay. 

As you indulge in those Halloween sweets, make sure to give your teeth a quick brushing afterwards. And if you don’t have a toothbrush handy, give your teeth a quick rinse until you get home to help prevent cavities. In fact, if you have little ones, make this a family affair. Crank on the tune “Monster Mash” and brush your teeth together!

If you have questions or concerns about Halloween candy, make an appointment today with Dr. Schnall at 212-247-7059 or visit our website at www.philipschnalldmd.com.

Dr. Philip Schnall proudly serves New York and all surrounding areas.

Autumn Leaves and Tooth Sensitivity | New York Dentist

As the days get shorter and the weather gets chillier, we begin to change up our diets a bit – drinks go from iced cold to piping hot. Unfortunately for some of us, this causes some major issues in our mouths.

Thankfully, there are some things you can do to prevent your teeth from becoming sensitive to your favorite autumn treats. By taking these proactive measures, you will not only decrease your chances of developing tooth sensitivity, but will also maintain your mouth’s overall good health:

Avoid acids. One of the easiest ways to keep your smile is to improve your diet. Instead of junk foods and acidic drinks like sodas, try eating more fruits and dairy as snacks. They will naturally scour stains from your teeth while producing saliva to wash any sugars left away.

Be gentle. One of the main reasons your tooth enamel may be thinning is due to your brushing. Brushing harder doesn’t clean your teeth better. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. For best results, use a soft-bristled toothbrush and hold it at a 45-degree angle while you brush gently in a circular motion.

Cool it on bleaching. We all want bright, Hollywood smiles, but overbleaching will begin to have an adverse effect on your teeth as it begins to wear down your enamel, exposing the discolored layers hiding beneath.

Don’t grind your teeth. Believe it or not, if you find that you are clenching your teeth or waking with headaches, see a dentist. Clenching your teeth will wear enamel, so you may need a mouth guard.

If you have questions or concerns about tooth sensitivity, make an appointment today with Dr. Schnall at 212-247-7059 or visit our website at www.philipschnalldmd.com.

Dr. Philip Schnall proudly serves New York and all surrounding areas.

Why You May Have Developed Gum Disease | New York Dentist

No one wants gum disease. And while it can be prevented with proper dental care, there are some things that can happen that will cause you to develop gum disease. Because gum disease is typically painless, you may not even know you have it. Only a dental professional can diagnose you.

But what causes gum disease? Plaque is the primary cause of gum disease. However, other factors can contribute to periodontal disease, including:

  • Hormonal changes, such as those occurring during pregnancy, puberty, menopause, and monthly menstruation, make gums more sensitive, which makes it easier for gingivitis to develop.
  • Various illnesses may affect the condition of your gums. This includes diseases such as cancer or HIV, because they interfere with the immune system. Diabetes’ effects on the body’s ability to use blood sugar makes patients with this disease at a higher risk of developing infections, including periodontal disease and cavities.
  • Medications can affect oral health, because some lessen the flow of saliva, which has a protective effect on teeth and gums.
  • Bad habits such as smoking make it harder for gum tissue to repair itself.
  • Family history of dental disease can be a contributing factor for the development of gingivitis.

Gum disease may progress without producing obvious signs, even in the late stages of the disease. Although the symptoms of periodontal disease can often be subtle, it can present some warning signs. But even if you don’t notice any symptoms, you may still have some degree of gum disease. In some people, gum disease may affect only certain teeth, such as the molars. Only a dentist or a periodontist can recognize and determine the progression of gum disease.

If you have questions or concerns about gum disease, make an appointment today with Dr. Schnall at 212-247-7059 or visit our website at www.philipschnalldmd.com.

Dr. Philip Schnall proudly serves New York and all surrounding areas.

Why Does My Breath Stink? | New York, NY

Has anyone ever randomly offered you a stick of gum? Do people stand back when you speak? You may have a case of halitosis, or bad breath. And while most cases of bad breath can be remedied with a stick of gum or a quick brushing. But if you find that it is a consistent occurrence, it could be a result of something more serious.

Obviously, the first option is to look at your dental hygiene practices. Do you brush for at least two minutes twice a day? Do you floss and rinse? Not being diligent with these daily tasks will not only lead to bad breath but also gum disease and other dental maladies.

The medical condition dry mouth (xerostomia) also can cause bad breath. Saliva is necessary to moisten the mouth, neutralize acids produced by plaque, and wash away dead cells that accumulate on the tongue, gums, and cheeks. If not removed, these cells decompose and can cause bad breath. Dry mouth may be a side effect of various medications, salivary gland problems, or continuous breathing through the mouth.

Many other diseases and illnesses may cause bad breath. Here are some to be aware of: respiratory tract infections such as pneumonia or bronchitis, chronic sinus infections, postnasal drip, diabetes, chronic acid reflux, and liver or kidney problems.

Don’t worry – there are a few things you can do to prevent your traditional forms of dragon breath. Here are tips to keep in mind going forward:

  • Practice good oral hygiene
  • See your dentist regularly
  • Quit tobacco products
  • Drink lots of water
  • Keep a log of the foods you eat

If you have questions or concerns about bad breath, make an appointment today with Dr. Schnall at 212-247-7059 or visit our website at www.philipschnalldmd.com.

Dr. Philip Schnall proudly serves New York and all surrounding areas.

Fighting Gum Disease at Home | New York Dentist

When we think about dental hygiene, most of us are thinking we are keeping our smiles bright and shiny – we never really stop and think about the damage we are preventing by brushing, flossing and rinsing each and every day. But in reality, that should be our main focus. Because if we ignore our dental health, it can lead to a number of dental issues in the future.

Periodontal disease is one of the most common problems Americans face – as many as half of American adults have some level of periodontal disease, and that percentage increases at higher ages. Periodontal, or gum, disease can take many forms – from mild gingivitis, with symptoms like red inflamed gums to severe periodontal disease, where pus from infections can push teeth from their socket.

Fortunately, there are things you can do at home to help prevent periodontal disease. Controlling harmful bacteria in the mouth can be done with a few home remedies. Saltwater rinses (1/2 tsp. of salt in a glass of warm water, swirled in your mouth for up to 60 seconds) and hydrogen peroxide (food grade, equal parts 3 percent hydrogen peroxide and water, swirled in your mouth for a few seconds and then spit out) can help combat bacteria in your mouth, while chewing sugar-free gum with Xylitol has antibacterial properties, in addition to producing saliva, which helps wash food particles from your mouth.

While there’s no substitute for professional dental visits, taking good care of your mouth at home will help keep periodontal disease at bay. If you see red, inflamed, or bleeding gums, it’s time to make an appointment to visit a professional – it’s best to treat periodontal disease before it becomes a serious problem.

If you have questions or concerns about gum disease, make an appointment today with Dr. Philip Schnall at 212-247-7059 or visit our website at www.philipschnalldmd.com.

Dr. Schnall proudly serves New York and all surrounding areas.

Starting Off the New Year Right | New York Dentist

Here we are…moments from a new year. And after this last one, we can theoretically only go up. And since now is the time we take a step back to take a look at ourselves in order to improve upon ourselves. Why not throw our dental health in the mix? And because our mouth is the first line of defense against other health issues, we should always try to keep our smiles healthy and bright. So, here are a few dental hygiene tips to help you brighten that smile and keep you on your dentist’s good side. They may seem obvious, but many of us can use the refresher:

Brushing. The rule of thumb is pretty well-known – brush your teeth twice a day, for at least two minutes. Start your day off right with fresh, clean breath and wrap up your day with a quick brush before bed to prevent cavities from forming while you snooze. Choose a soft-bristled toothbrush and brush in rounded strokes to keep your gums healthy as well.

Flossing. It’s one of the least favorite tasks on the list of dental hygiene tasks. The problem is, flossing not only removes stuff stuck deep between each tooth, but it also keeps your gums healthy by preventing bacteria from getting inside and causing infection.

Rinsing. Rinsing is not only a quick way freshen breath, but it also adds an additional layer of protection from plaque and cavities. We have been taught to rinse with mouthwash after brushing, but doing it beforehand can loosen any particles you may have, making your brushing more effective.

If you have questions or concerns about dental health, make an appointment today with Dr. Philip Schnall at 212-247-7059 or visit our website at www.philipschnalldmd.com.

Dr. Schnall proudly serves New York and all surrounding areas.

A Parent’s Guide to Halloween | New York Dentist

Things may be a little different this Halloween, especially when it comes to these new quarantine rules. Nonetheless, there are some things that will remain the same, and unfortunately, they revolve around sugar. Halloween brings with it some of the sweetest treats of all the holidays. Yes, Halloween isn’t exactly fun for your teeth. According to a study, the average child consumes between 3,700 to 7,000 calories worth of Halloween treats. That’s not even considering how much sugar is ingested. This is why it is very important to keep up with daily dental hygiene. To help your family stay healthy and safe, here is a list of tips you may want to take this Halloween:

Fill ‘em up. Sit down as a family and have a nutritious and filling meal before your Halloween outing so they aren’t as tempted to eat a lot of your candy afterwards.

Work it out. It may not be your typical trick-or-treating, but keeping a safe distance from other kids will make this a safe Halloween season. Make this a family affair and encourage them with a friendly competition for who can take the most steps or be the most active while collecting candy.

Pick and choose. Offer your children to have 1-3 pieces of candy per day, starting with lunch, or after dinner as a treat. Once they’re done, it’s time to brush.

Give it away. When your children get back home from trick-or-treating, have your kids put their candy into two piles: one they want to keep and one they don’t. Donate the remain candy to a local senior citizen center, or food pantry. Spread the Halloween love all around.

If you have questions or concerns about Halloween candy, make an appointment today with Dr. Philip Schnall at 212-247-7059 or visit our website at www.philipschnalldmd.com.

Dr. Schnall proudly serves New York and all surrounding areas.

Wake Up! It’s National Coffee Day | New York Dentist

It’s the beginning of the day for many. It’s the pick-me-up some need in the afternoon to make it through the day. And even during a pandemic, we are still lining up for a hot cup of coffee. But did you know today was National Coffee Day? It’s true. America’s favorite morning elixir has its own day to celebrate and today is that day.

And while coffee is the perfect beverage to wake us up, it is terrible for our teeth. The more we drink, the quicker our smile are affects. But this spans further than just tinging your smile – but it can also contribute to the buildup of plaque and tartar, while accelerating the progression of gum disease.

Gingivitis, or an inflammation of your gums caused by plaque, and periodontitis, a more advanced version of gingivitis that results in a gap between your teeth and your gums. When caught in the beginning gingivitis stage, it can be treated and, hopefully preventable in the future. Periodontitis, on the other hand, is more difficult to treat and, due to the gap between the teeth and gums, may cause your teeth to become loose and fall out.

When you drink coffee, it is affecting your mouth by lowering the temperature of your mouth and gums while reducing the blood flow to your gums, which does not allow your gums to get all of the necessary oxygen they need to continue functioning properly.

When it comes to gum disease, saliva plays a major role in prevention. It contains oxygen and specialized enzymes which help prevent gum disease by killing the unnecessary bacteria in your mouth. Drinking coffee can cause dehydration and reduce the amount of saliva you produce, thus increasing your chances of developing gum disease.

If you have questions or concerns about the affects of coffee, make an appointment today with Dr. Philip Schnall at 212-247-7059 or visit our website at www.philipschnalldmd.com.

Dr. Schnall proudly serves New York and all surrounding areas.

Digital Technology at the Dentist | New York Dentist

As each year passes, our technology improves, especially when it comes to visual aspects. Our movies become crisper and cleaner it feels like it’s really happening in front of your eyes. But this technology is being utilized in all sorts of industries, including the dental industry. Yes, your dentist now has digital x-rays for your checkups.

It may seem a bit excessive to have digital technology at the dentist, but there are plenty of reasons it is for your benefit. It allows dentists a wide variety of perspectives of the face, neck and teeth, giving you a better diagnosis and making a more complete treatment plan. With digital x-rays, dentists do a lot more than ever before. The technology is fast, simple and completely non-invasive, so there’s no need to worry. All you have to do is sit in the chair for a scan, and the dentist has a computer-generated view of your face, teeth and other important details from various perspectives. Not only does this help keep your mouth healthy but can also give you a better look into dental procedures you are about to have done.

The imaging system is basically an x-ray scanner, only it’s mounted on a rotating arm. While you sit in the chair, the scanner will move around your head to gather all the data necessary. There’s no preparation of any kind involved. The dentist can then call up any necessary view on a computer monitor. This accessibility makes it easier to see bones, teeth, airways, nerves, as well as tissues and see the relationship between them in order to create a more effective treatment plan.

If you have questions or concerns about digital x-rays, make an appointment today with Dr. Philip Schnall at 212-247-7059 or visit our website at www.philipschnalldmd.com.

Dr. Schnall proudly serves New York and all surrounding areas.